Curry Cauliflower Soup

Curry Cauliflower Soup

We’ve had some really crazy weather the past few days. As in…it’s May, and yesterday it was 86 degrees outside! And somehow, I found myself making….soup?

Strange, I know. Normally when the weather is so warm, I crave salads and melons and ice cream and cold things. And I actually had all those things in my fridge (well…except for the ice cream…but there’s an Oberweis down the street from my house….so yea). Also in my fridge? A head of cauliflower. And the poor thing just looked so dejected and sad sitting there on the shelf. Sometimes, food just speaks to me.

So I figured…alright. Let’s make soup! I had recently visited a Penzey’s store and bought some sweet curry powder, so I used that in the recipe along with some ground ginger and BOOM. Super delicious soup, with a wonderful flavor and creamy texture without the cream (just use milk instead). This is a lovely soup that tastes great but won’t make you feel guilty about calories. Enjoy!

Curry Cauliflower Soup

Curry Cauliflower Soup
 
Author:
Recipe type: Sides
Serves: 2-4
Ingredients
  • 32 oz vegetable or chicken broth
  • 1 head of cauliflower, cut into small florets
  • 1 cup milk
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon sweet curry powder
  • salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. In a large saucepan over medium heat, add broth and cauliflower florets. Cook until florets are soft, about 25-35 minutes.
  2. When florets are soft, pour entire saucepan contents into a blender and blend until smooth.
  3. Pour and press through a fine-mesh strainer back in the saucepan.
  4. Stir in milk, ground ginger, sweet curry powder, and salt and pepper.
  5. Serve warm.

 

NYC v3.0

So my sweet little sister is about to graduate from NYU with her Master’s in German in just a few weeks. But her birthday was back in April, so of course my dad and I had to fly in for a week of birthday fun, right? Right.

Other than spending some quality time with my sister, my favorite part of visiting NYC was a) the shows and b) THE FOOD. I LOVE the fact that I can find reasonably authentic cuisine from just about any culture I can think of, all on the island of Manhattan.  We tried to “eat in a different country” each meal we were there, and we did a pretty good job. This was my third trip to NYC, so let’s see what I did (read: ate) this time around, shall we?

First night in town was spent in Little Italy, at this cute little placed called Il Piccolo Bufalo. We shared two delicious appetizers (1: mozzarella, roasted red peppers and fresh basil and 2: prosciutto with melon slices) before digging into our entrées. I had the Chicken Cardinale, which was chicken breast layered with roasted peppers, mozzarella, prosciutto, and shallots in a pink sauce. SO GOOD.

NYC NYC NYC

The next day we had Spanish for lunch at Café Espagnol near NYU’s campus. It was my sister’s birthday, which totally = sangria with lunch. No shame. They had an amazing paella. Great place, great service, yummy food.

NYCNYC

Dessert came from an ATM. I kid you not. NYC just got its first Cupcake ATM. I was a bit excited.

NYC NYC

Dinner that night was at Little Poland in East Village. You know it’s good because it doesn’t have a website. We had a great time eating all the Polish specialities: placki, pierogie, cabbage rolls, kielbasa, etc. SO MUCH YUM.

NYC

After a nice short walk to the Bowery, dessert was at Rice to Riches, one of my favorites places in town.  It’s one of the few places I recommend if I know friends are visiting the city. Over a dozen varieties of rice pudding?!?! WINNING.

NYC

Brunch the next day was at Café Habana. OH MY GOD THE CORN. I need to make this at home. Like….now. Basically it’s grilled corn covered in mayo, cheese, and spices. I know…sounds gross. But it’s AMAZING. Sprinkle some lime on that puppy and you’ve got heaven on a stick.

NYC

The following night was special. We had tickets to see La Bohème at the Met Opera, so we got all dressed up for the evening. Dinner was at one of my favorite restaurants EVER….Euzkadi. LOVE LOVE LOVE this place. It’s Basque and Spanish cuisine, some of the best food I’ve ever had, and the people there are amazing. The restaurant itself is totes adorbs. So beautiful.

NYC NYCNYC NYCNYC NYC

Last day in NYC was exploring Brooklyn. My dad and I had lunch at this amazing place called House of Small Wonder. I found it on Yelp and we could not find it and then BOOM there was the door. The restaurant used to be a garden between two buildings and then they put on a roof, threw in some tables and BOOM there’s the restaurant. There are trees growing IN and THROUGH the restaurant. Awesome. Food was great too!

NYC NYCNYC NYC NYC

Then we checked out Mast Brothers. Required. Because I want my chocolate to be hipster.

NYC NYC

Our last night in NYC included me, my dad, my sister, and her two roommates at our “traditional” pizza stop: Grimaldi’s in Brooklyn. Also saw Christian Slater on the way in, so that was pretty cool.

NYC NYC

 

And then I had to go home. Le sad. But we had a great time in the Big Apple!

Lemon Ricotta Scones

Lemon Ricotta Scones

As you can see, April at Wanderlust and Waffles was all about scones. We started with these yummy Raspberry Lemon Sour Cream Scones, moved onto the Lemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta Scones, and now we’re ending the month (and the scone obsession) with these super spring-time appropriate Lemon Ricotta Scones.

As I mentioned in my last post, I now swear by ricotta for scones. I know some prefer buttermilk, and sour cream has worked for me in the past. But I’m nuts about the lighter, fluffier crumb I get when I use ricotta in the scone batter. It’s heavenly. And this time around, I just wanted LEMON. Lots and lots of lemony goodness. And I got it! Win!

I actually made these scones as payment for accommodation recently. I went to visit my sister in NYC and she has a couple of roommates. They were cool with me staying in their apartment for a week…provided I bring baked goodies. So I brought a dozen of these scones, and everyone was happy. I wish I could pay for the rest of the things in my life using baked goods. Phone bill? That’ll be…a dozen muffins, a quiche, and a carrot cake. Done.

Lemon Ricotta Scones Lemon Ricotta Scones Lemon Ricotta Scones Lemon Ricotta Scones

Lemon Ricotta Scones
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 8-10
Ingredients
Scones:
  • 2 oz sugar
  • zest from 3 lemons
  • 15 oz flour
  • 2½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 6 oz butter, cold, cubed
  • 1 egg
  • 8 oz ricotta
  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
Lemon Glaze:
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1⅓ cups powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar and lemon zest.
  2. Add flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Whisk well to combine.
  3. Using your fingers, cut in the butter.
  4. In a separate bowl, lightly beat egg. Mix in ricotta and lemon juice.
  5. Add egg mixture to flour mixture and mix to form a dough.
  6. Place on floured surface. Roll to 1" thickness and cut into rounds.
  7. Place on greased or paper-lined baking sheet.
  8. Bake in a 400° oven for 12-15 minutes, or until tops of scones are slightly browned.
  9. For the glaze: Melt butter in a glass bowl. Add powdered sugar and lemon juice and mix well. Glaze scones after allowing to cool slightly.

 

Lemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta Scones

Lemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta Scones

Officially, spring started on March 20th, almost a month ago. But here in the Midwest, it hasn’t felt like spring until recently. It’s snowed, twice, since that date. But spring is now finally, officially, here…and in my book that has nothing to do with a date on the calendar. For me, it’s all about the daffodils.

For me, daffodils are the symbol of spring. I think many people have their own little thing they look for, a sign directly from the universe to them that symbolizes the end of winter, and the promise of warmth and sunshine on its way. Crocuses in bloom, baby birds chirping in the trees, warmer temperatures, the release of Bell’s Oberon, etc. They all declare that spring is here and summer is close behind, and hopefully we’re free from the grip of winter for a few months.

Speaking of yellow happy things (such as sunshine and daffodils), lemons are a popular flavor in the spring and summer, so I was really happy to make these Raspberry Lemon Sour Cream Scones earlier this month. They were super delish, and gone within a couple days, so obviously I had to make more, right? But of course I wanted to switch it up a bit. So this time, I switched the raspberries for blueberries, sour cream for ricotta, and added a lemon glaze on top. The end result was a lighter, fluffier scone (I will now swear by ricotta for scones) that’s bursting with plump, juicy blueberries,  which just happen to pair perfectly with the sweet lemon glaze. Such a winning combination!

Lemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta SconesLemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta SconesLemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta SconesLemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta SconesLemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta Scones

Lemon-Glazed Blueberry Ricotta Scones
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 8-10
Ingredients
Scones:
  • 2 oz sugar
  • zest from 1 lemon
  • 15 oz flour
  • 2½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 6 oz butter, cold, cubed
  • 1 egg
  • 8 oz ricotta
  • 6 oz frozen blueberries
Lemon Glaze:
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1⅓ cups powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar and lemon zest.
  2. Add flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Whisk well to combine.
  3. Using your fingers, cut in the butter.
  4. In a separate bowl, lightly beat egg. Mix in ricotta.
  5. Add egg/ricotta mixture to flour mixture and mix to form a dough.
  6. Fold in blueberries.
  7. Place on floured surface. Roll to 1" thickness and cut into rounds.
  8. Place on greased or paper-lined baking sheet.
  9. Bake in a 400° oven for 12-15 minutes, or until tops of scones are slightly browned.
  10. For the glaze: Melt butter in a glass bowl. Add powdered sugar and lemon juice and mix well. Glaze scones after allowing to cool slightly.

 

2014 Quarter 1 Report

If you’re reading this, you must be a data nerd like me, so WELCOME!

It’s incredibly motivating to see progress here at Wanderlust and Waffles. So at the end of every quarter, I analyze the data regarding website traffic and publish a report on that information. I hope these reports will serve as a virtual “yardstick”  to document growth on this blog. I hope to look back one day and say “Dang! Look how far we’ve come!” Also, Google Analytics rocks my socks.

So, let’s start by looking at general traffic in the form of pageviews.

2014 Quarter 1 Pageviews

From January through March the traffic was quite “spiky”. Most of the spikes occurred right after a submission of mine was accepted at either Foodgawker or Tastespotting. Unfortunately, no acceptance = no traffic = no spike. You can see that there were a couple of periods of time (mid-late February, mid-late March), where there aren’t any spikes at all.

Those were rather discouraging times for me. None of my submission were being accepted on those sites (due to things like composition, photography angles, etc), even though the food was delicious and the recipes were sound. Those websites, if you think about it, are simply using your photography to decide if the food post is acceptable for their site. Does that seem a bit illogical to anyone else? They’re judging the quality of your food based on a photo. To me, it’s a tad unfair. Some of the best food I’ve ever eaten wouldn’t necessarily photograph well, and a good photo is quite circumstantial. A good photographer knows how to use light, depth of field, focus, and composition (among other things) to their advantage to make something look good. This really has nothing to do with the quality of the food. In order to be a successful food blogger then, you have to be both a good cook AND a good photographer. Taste AND quality AND a pretty picture. It’s quite demanding if you think about it. I’m curious, readers (anybody out there?). What’s more important to you? That the posted recipe results in delicious food, or that the picture is pretty? Leave me some comments!

Anyways, what’s interesting is to see where the traffic comes from during those spiky and non-spiky times. The spikes usually indicate referral traffic coming from Foodgawker or Tastespotting. But when the traffic is low yet steady, it’s often (and I find this pretty exciting), direct traffic. That means that people are coming straight to my blog, i.e. they didn’t see a submission on another website and use that as a portal. This leads me to believe that Wanderlust and Waffles has a very small but loyal group of followers who might have this blog bookmarked, or like me, have a list of food blogs that they review on a regular basis. Awesome!

2014 Quarter 1 Visits Last quarter = 3,132 pageviews from 1,880 unique visitors.

This quarter = 4,610 pageviews from 3,091 unique visitors.

Growth and progress yay!

Now, where did these fine people come from?

2014 Quarter 1 Traffic Sources

It makes sense that Foodgawker would be #1. Those spikes in traffic were the result of my submissions being accepted and displayed to a large audience of foodies like myself. But I LOVE that #2 is direct traffic. That rocks my socks.  And totes my goats. I also love that Pinterest is in the top 3, because they’re not expecting professional-level photography. As a user myself, I find that yes, I pin the food with amazing pictures, but mostly I pin what sounds AND looks good. Doesn’t require a gorgeous photo. Just has to make me hungry.

Finally, let’s see what posts were the post popular.

2014 Quarter 1 Pages

I think it’s amazing that the SIMPLEST recipe (How I Cook Asparagus) got the most hits. I don’t even really think of it as a recipe because it’s THAT easy. But it got a LOT of attention, due to Foodgawker, Tastespotting, AND Pinterest. “By your powers combined….” Plus this recipe was also featured in Healthy Recipes Magazine, a pretty cool e-mag for iPhone/iPad users. Which means, we’re published outside of this blog! Awesome!

So there you have it! The 2014 Quarter 1 report for Wanderlust and Waffles. I’m amazed by how many people clicked on a Facebook link, repinned a pin on Pinterest, or liked a recipe they saw on Foodgawker or Tastespotting. Thanks so much for visiting!

Raspberry Lemon Sour Cream Scones

Raspberry Lemon Sour Cream Scones

I spend a lot of time exploring other food blogs. I just love seeing what other people are cooking. And oggling their gorgeous food photography. Lately, I’ve been checking into Joy the Baker quite a bit since I consider myself more a baker than a cook. And it seems like she’s always baking biscuits. Or scones. The way she talks about them and the subsequent photos usually leave me drooling. And then I started having biscuit cravings…

I’ve been working a lot with sweet rolls in the past month. I say working, but what I mean is epically failing. A few months ago I made these Almond Walnut Rolls and everything went great. No issues with the yeast or anything. So recently I decided to make some more spring-like sweet rolls using the lovely flavor combination of lemon and raspberry. And for some reason, I CANNOT get the dough to rise. The first attempt, I thought maybe I killed the yeast by making the liquid too hot. The second time, I thought maybe the yeast was already dead. The third time, using a brand new packet of yeast…geez I dunno.

Let’s just say I decided to break up with yeast for a while. But I still wanted to do something with lemons and raspberries. So I spontaneously decided to make lemon raspberry scones. I used sour cream because that was the only dairy in the house at the time, but I have to say, it worked out well. These scones aren’t just “flour cakes”, they’re most and flavorful and the texture is delightful. The raspberries really shine and aroma hints of lemon and sunshine and happiness and did I mention it’s almost spring?!?!

Raspberry Lemon Sour Cream SconesRaspberry Lemon Sour Cream SconesRaspberry Lemon Sour Cream Scones

Raspberry Lemon Sour Cream Scones
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 8-10
Ingredients
  • 2 oz sugar
  • zest from 1 lemon
  • 15 oz flour
  • 2½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 6 oz butter, cold, cubed
  • 1 egg
  • 6 oz sour cream
  • 6 oz frozen raspberries
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar and lemon zest.
  2. Add flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Whisk well to combine.
  3. Using your fingers, cut in the butter.
  4. In a separate bowl, lightly beat egg. Mix in sour cream.
  5. Add egg/sour cream mixture to flour mixture and mix to form a dough.
  6. Fold in raspberries.
  7. Place on floured surface. Roll to 1" thickness and cut into rounds.
  8. Place on greased or paper-lined baking sheet.
  9. Bake in a 400° oven for 12-15 minutes, or until tops of scones are slightly browned.
Notes
It's totally normal that when you try to fold in the raspberries, roll out the dough, and cut the rounds that you'll have what seems to be a cold, goopy mess. Don't fret, the end result is still tasty and beautiful.

 

Raspberry Dark Chocolate Chip Muffins

Raspberry Dark Chocolate Chip Muffins

Breakfast = muffins = okay. Breakfast = raspberries = okay. Breakfast = chocolate = ???

I’m gonna say it’s okay. Because chocolate = happy, and happy = a great way to start your day! Right?

Obviously based on other recent posts, you know that I like muffins. I REALLY like muffins. See: Blueberry Oatmeal Muffins, Lemon Poppyseed Muffins, Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal Muffins, etc. I LOVE muffins. Wonderful for breakfast with a cup of tea or coffee, the perfect snack between meals, and I don’t feel super guilty if I eat half a dozen of them over the course of the day (…or y’know…a whole dozen…hahahahaha).

These might be my new favorite muffins though. You’ve got the yummy tart of the raspberries plus the decadence of dark chocolate chips. An AMAZING combination. And when they’re fresh out of the oven, all soft and warm and fluffy, and the chocolate is slightly gooey….HEAVEN.

Raspberry Dark Chocolate Chip MuffinsRaspberry Dark Chocolate Chip MuffinsRaspberry Dark Chocolate Chip Muffins

Raspberry Dark Chocolate Chip Muffins
 
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 12
Ingredients
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 oz sugar
  • 4 oz butter
  • 8 oz milk
  • 8 oz flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • pinch of salt
  • 8 oz frozen raspberries
  • 6 oz dark chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs and sugar.
  2. Melt the butter. Add butter and milk to the large bowl with eggs and sugar and whisk well.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the bowl of wet ingredients and mix together until well incorporated.
  4. Gently fold in frozen raspberries and chocolate chips. Spoon batter into a greased or paper-lined muffin tin.
  5. Bake in a 375°F oven for 20-22 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow to cool on wire rack before serving.

 

Lemon Herb Tilapia en Papillote

Lemon Herb Tilapia

I like simple. Especially in my own kitchen. I’m usually put off by recipes with really long lists of ingredients and instructions, even though I know the end result is likely worth it. And every now and then I’ll feel industrious and make something more complicated, and I’ll be rewarded with something amazing (like these Almond Walnut Rolls…takes forever, totally worth it!). But day to day cooking? I like to keep it simple.

Which brings me to what my hubby calls “fish in a bag”. Of course, I’ll correct him and say “Now honey, the technical term is ‘en papillote’. French, dear. You can handle it.” And he’ll roll his eyes and say “Yup, fish in a bag.”

A few years ago, we were traveling around Michigan’s Upper Peninsula (most beautiful place on Earth), and we stopped for dinner at this really simple, homey restaurant. Absolutely nothing fancy about this place. Dingy lighting. Peeling wallpaper. Plastic cups. They had whitefish en papillote and it sounded so fresh and healthy and yummy that I had to get it. This was after a few days in the UP, where healthy food is a bit hard to come by. Anyways, dinner. AMAZING. The fish was fresh-caught from Lake Superior, and the lemon and the herbs and the steamy goodness when I opened up the bag….heaven.

The recipe itself is frighteningly simple. Throw the fish into a parchment paper bag with some butter, lemon, and herbs and you’re set. Can’t get much more simple than that. It cooks quickly, has the most wonderful flavor and aroma, and because of the bag, comes out moist, tender, and amazingly delicious. Winning!

Lemon Herb TilapiaLemon Herb TilapiaLemon Herb TilapiaLemon Herb Tilapia

Lemon Herb Tilapia en Papillote
 
Author:
Recipe type: MainCourse
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 2 fresh tilapia filets
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • fresh rosemary & thyme
Instructions
  1. Place tilapia in the center of a rectangle of foil or parchment paper.
  2. Sprinkle salt and pepper.
  3. Cut butter into thin slices and place on top of fish (1 tablespoon total per filet).
  4. Cut lemon into slices and place on top of butter.
  5. Place the herbs on top of the lemon slices.
  6. Roll up sides of packet firmly, stapling if necessary to ensure the packet is completely closed up.
  7. Cook in 375° oven for 12-14 minutes.
  8. Serve warm.
Notes
A very nice way to serve this fish is still in the bag. That way, you can open the bag and enjoy the delicious aroma right before eating.

 

Turkey Meatballs

Turkey Meatballs

Meatballs are one of my top comfort foods. If I’m ever feeling stressed out at Ikea (crowds, size of the store, creepy-faced half-stuffed creatures for children), there’s always a lovely plate of Swedish meatballs ready to soothe me into a happy calm. Another comfort food? Spaghetti! But without meatballs, spaghetti is just sad. I mean c’mon…if you think about it…meatballs are just mini meatloafs. And meatloaf is pretty darn comforting.

Comfort foods sometimes have a bad rap in the US. Probably because our normal comfort foods (macaroni and cheese, fried chicken, meatloaf, mashed potatoes and gravy, etc) are usually some of the least healthiest foods for us. But that doesn’t have to be the case.

Take these meatballs for example. I used extra-lean ground turkey breast, Italian style panko breadcrumbs, and one egg. That’s it. The breadcrumbs provide the seasoning, the turkey provides the meaty comforting goodness, and the egg holds it all together. It’s one of the simplest recipes I can think of, and the end result is always delicious and healthy. They’re good enough to eat plain, but often we’ll douse them in BBQ sauce, drizzle them with honey, or throw them on top of spaghetti. All covered in cheese (not). Just don’t lose your poor meatball if somebody sneezes. (Summer camp songs? You remember?) Did I happen to mention that each meatball is just under 30 calories and packed with protein?

Turkey MeatballsTurkey MeatballsTurkey Meatballs

Turkey Meatballs
 
Author:
Serves: 32
Ingredients
  • 16 oz lean ground turkey
  • 1 cup panko bread crumbs, Italian style
  • 1 egg
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in large bowl.
  2. Mix well using hands.
  3. Roll into 1-2" balls.
  4. Space evenly on a large greased or paper-lined baking sheet.
  5. Bake in 350° oven for 15-20 minutes, or until browned and cooked through.
  6. Serve warm, tossed in BBQ sauce, drizzled with honey, or plain.

 

Chicken Paprikash

Chicken Paprikash

Once upon a time, I got to spend a long weekend in Budapest, Hungary with my good teacher friend K. Although we saw lots of interesting monuments and cultural sites during that short trip, three specific things are forever cemented in my memory when I think of Budapest: extreme cold (we went in January), strudel (did you know Hungarian wheat has a very high proportion of gluten?), and chicken paprikash. We probably had this dish at least three different times during our 5-day trip. And we could never agree which restaurant made it best. Ultimately, we decided that the best chicken paprikash was probably made by someone’s adorable grandmother in her traditional Hungarian kitchen, and not in a restaurant at all.

Unfortunately, I do not have an adorable Hungarian grandmother from whom I could borrow a recipe for this amazing dish. And I’m sure there are more traditional recipes floating around on the internet. This is simply my interpretation of it, recreated as simply as I could in my humble American kitchen. But you know what? It still reminds me of those bitterly cold days walking around Budapest, hungry and freezing, and finding refuge in a cozy restaurant and a plate of steaming-hot chicken paprikash. Hungarian comfort food. For the win.

Chicken PaprikashChicken Paprikash

Chicken Paprikash
 
Author:
Recipe type: MainCourse
Cuisine: Hungarian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 3 oz + 1 oz butter
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 yellow onion, sliced
  • 16 oz chicken broth
  • 4 oz sour cream
  • ⅓ cup flour
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • egg noodles
Instructions
  1. In a large pot over medium heat, melt 1 oz of butter. Add onions and sauté until transparent, stirring occasionally. Remove onions from pot and set aside.
  2. Melt 3 oz of butter. Stir in paprika. Add chicken. Brown the chicken in the butter/paprika, turning once.
  3. Re-add the onions. Add chicken broth. Cover and reduce heat. Allow to simmer for approximately one hour or until chicken is cooked through.
  4. While chicken is cooking, boil a pot of water and cook egg noodles according to directions on package.
  5. When chicken is cooked through, remove and place in serving bowl.
  6. Add flour and sour cream to the pot. Turn to medium high heat and stir frequently until sauce has thickened.
  7. Serve sauce over the chicken with egg noodles on the side.